Welcome to Polly Heron's website.

 

I am a saga writer living on the North Wales coast, but I am originally from Manchester, which is where my books are set.

 

I am delighted to introduce my saga series, The Surplus Girls.

 

I also write as Susanna Bavin.

Latest News:

 

I have some wonderful news for you - Christmas with the Surplus Girls is now available for pre-order on Kindle at £2.37.

In a time-limited deal, The Surplus Girls' Orphans is 99p on Kindle.
The Surplus Girls is currently on Kindle Unlimited.

 

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Here is a quick link for you to my Author Page on Amazon UK.

My Susanna Bavin books:

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If you haven't read my Susanna books, The Deserter's Daughter, which was my first published novel, is available on Kindle Unlimited.

 

1920, Manchester. Carrie Jenkins is trying on her wedding dress, eagerly anticipating becoming Mrs Billy Shipton. But all too soon she is reeling from the news that her beloved father was shot for desertion during the Great War. When Carrie is jilted and she and her family are ostracised by the close-knit community, her plans and hopes for the future are in disarray.

 

Desperate to overcome her pain and humiliation, Carrie puts her faith in a man who is not to be trusted, and she will face danger and heartache before she can find the happiness she deserves.

Who were the Surplus Girls? 
 

The Great War wiped out a generation of young men and left behind a generation of young women who faced a life without the probability of marriage, at a time when any girl left on the shelf rapidly became an old maid and no working woman could hope to earn what could be earned by a man, even by a man doing the same job. These were the ‘surplus girls’ – young women who had grown up assuming they would get married, but whose dreams and assumptions were dashed by the War; young women who, unexpectedly and without preparation, faced a lifetime of work and spinsterhood.

 

What inspired the story behind The Surplus Girls?

When my dad was a boy, his mother used to take him every Saturday morning to visit his great-aunts, who were spinsters and who all lived together. From hearing about them when I was a child, I know he adored them. Strictly speaking, they weren’t surplus girls because they were a bit too old for that, but I was always fascinated by the thought of these sisters living together and supporting one another without the benefit of the kind of money a man could earn.